Fast Facts

  • 90% of brain growth happens by age 6.
     
  • The first 6 years of life affect learning, behaviour, and health throughout a person's life.
     
  • From birth to age 6, children experience sensitive periods during which they can learn language, social skills, physical coordination, and much more more easily than at any other age. As adults, we use the foundation built in early childhood in almost every aspect of our day-to-day lives.
  • Young children learn best through play and exploration.
     
  • Children are born ready to learn. Kids learn best in happy, healthy, playful, and stimulating environments - whether in the home, outdoors, in child care, or in places in their neighbourhood and community.
  • The Canadian Senate Committee on Population Health (2009) recently concluded that improvements in early childhood development is the best way to improve overall population health in Canada.
     
  • Over half of children ages 3 to 5 regularly spend time in a child care setting; over 70% of mothers whose youngest child is aged 3 to 5 work in paid employment. Excellent child care setting are critical to child development.
  • Investment in early childhood education brings greater returns than investment in any other stage of children's education.
     
  • Investing in high quality early childhood education and care is key to a strong economy.
     
  • 1 in 4 children in Canada are considered Canadian children are vulnerable in at least one aspect of their development at kindergarten entry.
  • 1 in 3 children in Regina are considered vulnerable in at least one aspect of their development at kindergarten entry (Early Development Instrument, 2009).
     
  • 1 in 7 children in Canada under age 6 lives below the low income cut-off (after tax).
     
  • 1 in 5 children in Regina under age 6 lives below the low income cut-off (after tax).
     
  • Strong and supportive neighbourhoods and local communities can support positive child development outcomes and help families overcome some of the risks associated with lower socioeconomic status.

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